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COVID-19 City Resources  •  Guidelines when visiting the Littleton Center

In compliance with Tri-County Health Department orders, masks worn over the nose and mouth are required for entry into all city buildings and facilities

Current, Upcoming & Past Exhibits

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Littleton Museum offers visitors a unique link between the past and present. Located on 40 acres adjacent to Ketring Lake, the museum encompasses three exhibition galleries, a children's interactive gallery, research center, and two 19th-century living history farm sites.

The Permanent Gallery exhibits a comprehensive historical look at Littleton from pre-history to the present through graphics, photography, and artifacts from the museum's collections. The Fine Arts Gallery hosts original art and photography exhibits sponsored by the Littleton Fine Arts Board. The Changing Gallery displays temporary and traveling exhibits from the Smithsonian Institution, other museums, and the Littleton Museum Collections.

Littleton: Spirit of Community

This permanent exhibit depicts, through artifacts and text, the "Littleton Story" from its early beginnings to the present.
*This exhibit is currently closed to the public due to COVID-19. 

Spirit of Community exhibit at the Littleton Museum Spirit of Community exhibit at the Littleton Museum


The Way We Played

Exhibit dates: September 13, 2019 to January 3, 2021

The Littleton Museum is excited to present the exhibition The Way We Played. Inspired by nostalgia, this is a toy exhibit for all ages. Featuring artifacts from the Littleton Museum collection, as well as objects on loan, the exhibit prompts visitors to consider the ways that they engaged with different types of toys as a child. The interactive stations included in the exhibit assist in the nostalgic experience through sensory engagement. There is even a memory share station where visitors can read other community members’ stories about their favorite toys from childhood, and in turn leave their message about the way they played. The museum has produced a video about this exhibit.

The Aroma of Play, part of "The Way We Played" exhibit at the Littleton Museum. The Way We Played, an exhibit at the Littleton Museum

Vibrant Bounty: Chinese Folk Art from the Shaanxi Region 

August 14 – October 17, 2020

Shengtao Zhao, Harvesting Sugar Cane in the North, 1985-1991, tempera on paper.
Shengtao Zhao,Harvesting Sugar Cane in the North, 1985-1991, tempera on paper.

 

As brilliant as the petals of a lotus and as bold as a spring storm, the folk paintings and artifacts of rural China reveal a national spirit that is as charming as it is vital. The artifacts in Vibrant Bounty reveal a humanity that aids us in understanding a people half a world away. By depicting scenes of labor within lavish pastoral settings, the paintings celebrate the farmers’ unity amidst the immensity of nature. 

Vibrant Bounty: Chinese Folk Art from the Shaanxi Region invites visitors on a journey through Shaanxi Province, one of the cradles of Chinese civilization. The capital city, Xi’an, was once the eastern terminus of the Silk Road, and is famous for its ancient ruins, most notably the Mausoleum of Qin Shi Huang and his Terracotta Army. In an area outside of the city’s center lies Huxian (or Hu) County, where, since the 1950s, local artists have been producing objects similar to the twenty-five paintings and fourteen objects found in Vibrant Bounty. This tradition has achieved great renown in China, culminating in the state Ministry of Culture awarding Huxian the honorary title of a “Village of Chinese Modern Folk Painting” in 1988.

These peasant, or farmer, paintings are closely related to the traditional Chinese arts of embroidery, batik (a fabric dyeing method), paper-cut, and wall painting. The artists use shui fen (paint powder and water—similar to gouache or tempera) on thick paper to create the paintings. While Huxian peasant paintings depict ordinary aspects of people’s lives, the vibrant colors emanate from an animated atmosphere, and are only enriched by frequent hyperbole and moral connotations. Festivals, parades, the harvest, music, village traditions, farm animals, winter, kitchen work, and children are all celebrated in these paintings.

The artifacts included in this collection expose us further to Chinese rural life and they show, in detail, traditional Shaanxi customs. They range from children’s clothing and toys to New Year’s prints and decorative household items, often embroidered with lucky figures and animals. Not only are they carefully handmade and beautiful, they also hold symbolic wishes for good luck, good marriage, and good health.

Both the art and the objects featured in this exhibition introduce us to a region of China, which like the American Midwest, is dominated by agriculture and populated with working people. Through these peasant paintings and the artifacts which accompany them, we gain a greater understanding of the customs and culture of people who, despite great distances, share with us essential similarities.

This exhibit is curated by America Meredith, Cherokee Nation artist and arts writer and is a program of ExhibitsUSA and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Visit the Vibrant Bounty exhibit page for additional information, including a list of programming and the virtual tour.

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