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Current, Upcoming & Past Exhibits

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Littleton Museum offers visitors a unique link between the past and present. Located on 40 acres adjacent to Ketring Lake, the museum encompasses three exhibition galleries, a children's interactive gallery, research center, and two 19th-century living history farm sites.

The Permanent Gallery exhibits a comprehensive historical look at Littleton from pre-history to the present through graphics, photography, and artifacts from the museum's collections. The Fine Arts Gallery hosts original art and photography exhibits sponsored by the Littleton Fine Arts Board. The Changing Gallery displays temporary and traveling exhibits from the Smithsonian Institution, other museums, and the Littleton Museum Collections.

Littleton: Spirit of Community

This permanent exhibit depicts, through artifacts and text, the "Littleton Story" from its early beginnings to the present.

Spirit of Community exhibit at the Littleton Museum Spirit of Community exhibit at the Littleton Museum


The Way We Played

Exhibit dates: September 13, 2019 to January 3, 2021

The Littleton Museum is excited to present the exhibition The Way We Played. Inspired by nostalgia, this is a toy exhibit for all ages. Featuring artifacts from the Littleton Museum collection, as well as objects on loan, the exhibit prompts visitors to consider the ways that they engaged with different types of toys as a child. The interactive stations included in the exhibit assist in the nostalgic experience through sensory engagement. There is even a memory share station where visitors can read other community members’ stories about their favorite toys from childhood, and in turn leave their message about the way they played. The museum has produced a video about this exhibit.

The Aroma of Play, part of "The Way We Played" exhibit at the Littleton Museum. The Way We Played, an exhibit at the Littleton Museum

image of hand holding a banana and abstract painting with paper airplane
 

per·spec·tives: Best of Show exhibition featuring artwork by Gabrielle Graves and Courtney Cotton

Exhibit dates: May 22 – July 19, 2020

Visit the per·spec·tives exhibit page

The Littleton Museum presents the artwork of Gabrielle Graves and Courtney Cotton, 2019 winners of the  Eye of the Camera and Own an Original exhibits, respectively. 

While both of the artists’ current body of work focuses on the idea of "perspectives," each artist approaches it with her own unique emphasis and skillset. Cotton’s conceptual painting is meant to bring awareness to mental wellness and emotional intelligence by using visual metaphors and color to embody concepts such as transformation, and possibility. Graves explores the complex narrative of identity and its intersection with consumption and mental health. Her process employs photography, painting, video, and installation to create intimate experiences revolving around changing landscapes and internal dialogue.

Gabrielle Graves received her B.A. in Psychology with a minor in Art & Design from the University of Michigan in April 2017. Shortly after graduating, Gabrielle moved to Snowmass Village, CO to work in the Photography & New Media and Painting departments at the internationally known Anderson Ranch Arts Center. She has also worked as a studio assistant for Isa Catto Studio. Her work has been featured in group exhibitions such as the Patton-Mallott Gallery at Anderson Ranch and the Littleton Museum, and she has collaborated with other artists to create installations such as DECONSCIOUSNESS: Three Levels of Consciousness, which was shown at the Stamps School of Art & Design in 2017. Gabrielle’s practice employs photography, painting, installation, and writing to divulge honest articulations of the psychological space. She is inspired by relationships and forms of identity.

Courtney Cotton is a Denver-based visual artist who is unafraid to express herself by giving visual expression to feeling, which can be seen in many of her paintings and collages. Other inspiration stems from music, mindfulness, and objects that give her a visceral reaction. Whatever the impulse, the result is the fruition of a process, usually grounded in personal discipline that may be spontaneous and rapid or labored and introspective. What transpires, ideally captures the inspiration and transforms it into an exuberant explosion or a contemplative and solemn stillness. 

Her work sometimes poses more questions than answers, but it offers room for interpretation and new perspectives. It connects to something universal and hence touches a lot of people. Cotton says, "I have more than one visual voice and some find it hard to define or categorize my style." Sometimes her work is thematic, but just as often she has the impulse to create something without representing anything. Some of her favorite pieces just came about from the act of playing with paint and paper. She explains, "I consciously react with the medium, the activity of creating is paramount, and therefore the results happen automatically with the unconscious influence of experiences and emotions." 

Cotton studied art and architecture at the University of South Carolina, Rhode Island School of Design, and Queens College.